I know I heard this song when I was a child but the the first time I heard it where it meant anything was actually in church. Churches in the early nineties were figuring out that it as o.k. not to be stuffy and that began to be reflected in the music. Now, our church was no rest home. We had always had a great band and exciting music but the fact that we could loosen up and be creative was helped along by hiring a young worship minister. The use of “secular” music being converted was frowned upon by many but I loved it. Some churches were using songs by U2 (Where The Streets have No Name) and Kool and the Gang (Celebrate) which I loved, it took people to another place with the music.

I remember It was in the Sunday night service where I heard I Can’t Stop Falling In Love With You because the Sunday night service was where we let our hair down a little more and only the die-hards would show up. It was the last song of the worship set and I remember it taking me to a special place. The worship leader led the first and last part the song and the chorus. The song, although written from a person to person aspect, reflected and resonated in my heart about my relationship with God.

Scripture tells me that we love God because he first loved us and Psalm 103 gives several reasons to love God such as Him saving us, delivering us, and forgiving us. Not to mention that the Bible plainly says that God IS LOVE. But, true love is not what others do for us and it’s really not what God did for me but why God did it. He loved me when I was unlovable. He gave his Son Jesus Christ for me so our relationship could be restored.

Elvis loved his gospel music and can’t help but feel that that on the night we sang his song as a gospel tune, Elvis smiled and sang along with us.

Other versions of this song sung by Elvis and other great artists.

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Have you heard an Elvis song or another "secular" song in church? If so, tell me in the comments.